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English

Why study English?

The aim of our English curriculum is that students will become sophisticated and critical readers. Through wider reading, they will develop their appreciation for the writer’s craft, which they will then demonstrate in their own writing. Beyond the classroom, we hope that they will continue to engage confidently with social and moral issues. Our curriculum seeks to provide opportunities to fully develop in these areas.

English KS3

Key Stage 3 Knowledge Progression Map                 Prior knowledge      New Knowledge         Potential misconception        ‘non-portable’ knowledge

 

Year 7

 

Learning Cycle 1: The dramatic world of Shakespeare

 

 

Learning Cycle 2: Journeys through poetry

 

Learning Cycle 3: Windows to the World

 

What a play is

How to find evidence

What a character is

Who Shakespeare is

What a hero is

What a villain is: superheroes and comic books

What a genre is

What are the ‘typical’ Shakespearean genres: Comedy, History, Tragedy

What the genre of a tragedy includes

How to give an opinion about character using inference

To know what plot is   

That the ‘Shakespearean era’ refers to the end of the Elizabethan era and the start of the Stuart age’

Specific character names

Plot of A Winter’s Tale

Opinions about characters in a Winter’s tale

What a poem is: do all poems have to rhyme

To find evidence

What rhyme, simile and metaphor are: check understanding

Some distinct forms: Haiku, Shape, Acrostic

How to identify the key ideas in a text

What implicit is

What explicit is

How to use inference to identify explicit Ideas and implicit ideas

Who the reader is

Who the writer is

What cultural identity is

What a ‘voice’ is

What a writer’s voice is

What ‘cultural identity’ is

Factual detail about the Windrush Generation

Who the reader is

Who the writer is

What a character is

How to give an opinion about character using inference

To know what plot is  

What a ‘voice’ is

What words are: adjective, verbs, adverbs

What sentences are: simple, compound, complex

What a point of view is

What a perspective is

What character voice is

How word choice helps to create a character

How to comment on words and sentences

How to comment on the plot using a Freytag model

How to write an informal letter

How to use words to create an effective character voice

The names/ plot/ specific context on the novel

 

Text Type: academic writing (AO1 style reader response) 

Text Type: academic writing (AO2 style reader response)

Text Type: letter writing, AO1/AO2 language

 

 

 

Year 8

 

Learning Cycle 1: The Gothic

 

 

Learning Cycle 2: Romeo and Juliet: narrative

 

Learning Cycle 3: Then and Now

 

To know what ‘description’ is – will they confuse this with narrative?

What a genre is

What character is

What setting is

What an adjective is

What metaphor and simile – check

How to comment on words and sentences

understanding of this

What is a ‘typical’ Gothic text? Good versus evil, supernatural characters Also includes: ancient or religious settings, innocent victims, death, darkness, romance, phobias. Be clear about the differences between this and horror

What an archetype is

What archetypal characters are: like ghosts, vampires and werewolves. Or sometimes it's humans that seem to have something different about them.  

Why the Gothic was popular: reflecting fears surrounding changes in society and the novel as a form of entertainment

To know what pathetic fallacy and personification is

How to comment on descriptive methods

To know how to use methods to create an effective Gothic Setting   

Specific authors/character names. Specific details of plot.

What a play is

Who Shakespeare is

What a genre is

What the genre of a tragedy includes

What an archetype is

How to give an opinion about character using inference

What the Freytag model is – once Yr 7 LC3

What a point of view is

How Shakespeare’s context may influence the reader/audience: love and marriage

What a prologue is and why it is used

How structural devices are used in narrative and dramatic texts: foreshadowing, flashbacks, flash forwards, signposts.

How to write about how structural features are used in a drama text.

How to evaluate the structural methods used by a writer.

What are archetypes are and how they are used in the play: e.g. angry young man, the hopeless romantic, the voice of reason, the controlling parents

How to use narrative devices in their own writing.

How to use writing based on feedback.

Plot and characters in Romeo and Juliet

What a point of view is

What a perspective is

Who the reader is

Who the writer is

What implicit is

What explicit is

How to infer

What an article is: headline, caption, picture KS2

What is an ‘issue’?

What could an ‘issue’ be in today?

What a fact and an opinion is

How to identify and comment upon facts and opinions

How to identify and comment upon a writer’s point of view

How to summarise

What emotive language is

How emotive language is used to convey point of view

How to use the language of contrast and comparison

What 19th Century issues are: poverty, crime, pollution, lack of rights for children

Dickens was a social reformer

How to write an article

Names of non-fiction writers

 

Text Type: descriptive writing, AO2 language

Text Type: narrative writing, AO2 structure

Text Type: article writing, summary 

 

 

 

Year 9

 

Learning Cycle 1: The Uncanny

 

 

Learning Cycle 2: Dystopia

 

Learning Cycle 3: Social Injustice

 

How to use the language of contrast and comparison

What a genre is

What character is

What setting is

What an adjective, metaphor, simile, pathetic fallacy and personification

How to comment on descriptive methods

What is a ‘typical’ Gothic text?

How to comment on words and sentences

What is a point of view/ perspective?

How to use the language of contrast and comparison

What is the ‘uncanny’

What is ‘the supernatural’

How has the supernatural been viewed historically

What is a séance and table turning

What are the features of a ghost story

Why were ghost stories popular at Christmas

What are the features of a ‘speech’: hyperbole, rule of three, emotive lang.

How to use ‘signposts’ to structure a coherent argument

How to use a counterargument

How to open and end a speech effectively

 

 

 

What the following methods are: adjective, adverbs, verbs, metaphor, simile, pathetic fallacy, personification, simple, complex and compound sentences, opening, characterisation, setting and perspective.

How to comment upon the effects of methods.

How to use descriptive devices in their own writing.

How structural devices are used in narrative and dramatic texts: foreshadowing, flashbacks, flash forwards, signposts.

How to write about how structural features are used in a drama text.

How to evaluate the structural methods used by a writer.

How to know how to make links between the writer’s use of methods and their intention.

That a Utopia is an imagined place or state of things in which everything is perfect (Paradise, heaven).

That Dystopia means: A community or society that is undesirable or frightening.

The key features of Dystopian Fiction are: Most dystopian works present a world in which oppressive societal control and the illusion of a perfect society are maintained through one or more of the following types of controls: large corporations, bureaucracy, technology and religious/ ideological control.

That a dystopian protagonist:

-         often feels trapped and is struggling to escape.

-         questions the existing social and political systems.

-         believes or feels that something is terribly wrong with the society in which he or she lives.

-         helps the audience recognizes the negative aspects of the dystopian world through his or her perspective.

Character’s names and plots of extracts studied

 

How to identify information from a text

What a fact and opinion are

What is a point of view/ perspective

That the ‘Shakespearean era’ refers to the end of the Elizabethan era and the start of the Stuart age’

What 19th Century issues are: poverty, crime, pollution, lack of rights for children

Dickens was a social reformer

How to use the language of contrast and comparison

What a ‘voice’ is

What a writer’s voice is

What rhyme, simile and metaphor are:

What Social Injustice is

What is ‘poverty’ its effects

What is ‘materialism’ and ‘capitalism’

What a hierarchy is

What feudal means

What life was like for poor ‘Shakespeareans’

How to evaluate using evidence

What poverty was like in Post War Britian

What is ‘poverty’ today?

To know key poetic terms are their effects: poem, rhyme, rhyme scheme, (form: sonnets, free verse), tone and voice, caesura and enjambment.

To know how to approach poems: opening lines, titles, sentence level and word level.

To know how to write about an unseen poem.

 

 

Who Chaucer is

Maslow’s hierarchy of needs.

 

 

Text Type: Speech, AO1 perspectives

Text Type: Descriptive, AO2 language

Text Type: Academic writing unseen poetry

English KS4

All students will study the AQA specifications for GCSE English Language and Literature, with examinations for both GCSE subjects being taken at the end of Year 11.

English Language GCSE https://www.aqa.org.uk/subjects/english/gcse/english-language-8700


English Literature GCSE https://www.aqa.org.uk/subjects/english/gcse/english-literature-8702

 

Learning Cycle 1

Learning Cycle 2

Learning Cycle 3

Year 10

English Literature Paper 2: Modern texts and poetry (‘Blood Brothers’)


English Literature Paper 1: Shakespeare and the 19th century novel (Revision of ‘Macbeth’ and ‘A Christmas Carol’)


English Language Paper 1: Explorations in creative writing and reading (Section B; Question 5 ONLY: Writing to describe)

English Literature Paper 2: Modern texts and poetry (Poetry anthology – ‘Love and Relationships’ cluster)


English Language Paper 2: Writers’ viewpoints and perspectives (Section B; Question 5 ONLY: Writing to argue/persuade/explain/advise)

English Literature Paper 2: Modern texts and poetry (Revision of ‘Blood Brothers’)


English Literature Paper 2: Modern texts and poetry (Unseen poetry) 


*NEA: Spoken Language to be completed after the end of Year 10 assessment

Year 11

English Language Paper 1: Explorations in creative writing and reading (Coverage of entire paper) 


English Literature Paper 2: Modern texts and poetry (Revision of ‘Blood Brothers’, Poetry anthology – ‘Love and Relationships’ cluster and Unseen poetry)

English Language Paper 2: Writers’ viewpoints and perspectives (Coverage of entire paper) 


English Literature Paper 1: Shakespeare and the 19th century novel (Revision of ‘Macbeth’ and ‘A Christmas Carol’) 

Revision of all four papers ahead of the summer external examination series 



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